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1999 Publications

GASTROINTESTINAL SYMPTOMS AND MENTAL STATUS CHANGES IN RELATION TO FOOD AND FLUID INTAKE DURING A 100 MILE TRAIL RUNby B.W. Glace, C.M. Murphy, C. Roros, and G.W. Gleim, FACSMNISMAT, Lenox Hill Hospital, N.Y., N.Y - last modified 2013-02-09 00:00
Med Sci Sport Exer 31(5), s81, 1999

 

We monitored food and fluid consumption, gastrointestinal complaints (GIsx) and mental status changes (MSC) during the Vermont 100 Miler. Anthropometric measures were made the day prior to the race and at the finish in 19 runners (45+/-3yrs).

Intake and symptoms were monitored at food stations every 8 miles throughout the event. The runners were evaluated for MSC (dizziness and/or confusion, n=11) and No MSC (n=8) as well as GIsx (nausea, vomiting and/or diarrhea, n=11) or No GIsx (n=8). There was no difference in weight loss between groups. Runners experiencing MSC ate more than asymptomatic runners.

(Differences in Kcal, carb and pro in italics, p<0.05)

Intake was greatest between miles 27-55; most MSC were reported after 55 miles. Intakes between GIsx groups did not differ significantly, but similar trends of increased intake in those with symptoms were evident. High energy intake during an ultramarathon does not appear to be the best strategy for maintaining mental status.