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1993 Publications

Effect of Stabilization or Isokinetic Knee Extension and Flexion Torque Productionby S. Peter Magnusson, PT, Richard A. Geismar, PT, Gilbert W. Gleim, PhD, James A. Nicholas, MDS. Peter Magnusson is supervisor of physical therapy at the Nicholas Institute of Sports Medicine and Athletic Trauma (NISMAT) at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York, NY 10021; Richard A. Geismar is a physical therapy student at Columbia University in New York; Gilbert W. Gleim is Director of Research at NISMAT; James A. Nicholas is Founding Director at NISMAT. - last modified 2013-02-09 00:00
Journal of Athletic Training, 1993;28(3):221-224

 

The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of four methods of stabilization on maximal reciprocal isokinetic knee extension and flexion. Left knee extension/flexion was tested at 60 deg/s in 20 subjects.

Warm-up consisted of five submaximal and one maximal effort followed by three maximal efforts in each of four randomized stabilization conditions:

1) Hands and back stabilization; the trunk was strapped to the back rest and the hands grasped the seat.

2) Back stabilization; the trunk was strapped to the back rest and the hands were folded across the chest.

3) Hand stabilization; the hands grasped the seat and the back rest was removed.

4) No stabilization; the hands were folded across the chest and the back rest removed.

One-way repeated measures ANOVA showed a significant effect of stabilization for knee extension (F (3, 57) = 17.44, p = .0001) and knee flexion (F (3, 57) = 5.37, p = .002). Paired, two tailed student's t-tests with Bonferroni correction showed that, in knee extension, no stabilization was significantly less than all others, p < .001.

In addition, back stabilization was less than hands and back stabilization, p < .005. In knee flexion, no stabilization was significantly less than all others, p < .01.

In conclusion, the method of trunk stabilization significantly affected maximal reciprocal isokinetic knee extension/flexion strength measurements. Maximal knee extension/flexion torque production was achieved when the trunk was strapped to the back support and when the hands grasped the seat.