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1989 Publications

Exercise-related changes in serum catecholamines and potassium: effect of sustained exercise above and below lactate threshold.by Coplan NL, Gleim GW, Nicholas JA. - last modified 2013-05-16 13:39
Am Heart J. 1989 May;117(5):1070-5.

 

Plasma potassium and catecholamines exhibit rapid shifts during exercise testing, particularly when exercise intensity exceeds lactate threshold. To assess changes that may occur during sustained exercise, we studied 10 healthy men to determine the effect of 20 minutes of exercise at 25 W above lactate threshold (ALT) and 20 minutes of exercise at 25 W below lactate threshold (BLT). Both conditions showed elevation of catecholamines at end exercise compared to baseline, but catecholamine levels ALT were significantly higher than the levels BLT (2270 +/- 190 versus 900 +/- 230 pg/ml norepinephrine, p less than 0.001; 509 +/- 69 versus 150 +/- 18 pg/ml epinephrine, p less than 0.001). This difference persisted at 2 minutes of recovery (1620 +/- 130 versus 590 +/- 60 pg/ml norepinephrine, p less than 0.001; 216 +/- 31 versus 98 +/- 16 pg/ml epinephrine, p less than 0.001). Both conditions resulted in a significant elevation in potassium at end exercise compared to baseline, but the potassium levels ALT were significantly higher than the levels BLT (1.1 +/- 0.1 mEq/L versus 0.5 +/- 0.1 mEq/L, p less than 0.001. The fall in potassium in the immediate post-exercise period was significantly greater following exercise ALT (-0.8 +/- 0.1 mEq/L versus -0.2 +/- 0.1 mEq/L, p less than 0.001). Thus sustained exercise slightly ALT resulted in a significant potassium flux and very elevated catecholamine levels. Avoiding these metabolic stresses by exercising BLT may decrease chances for exercise-related arrhythmia or other cardiac dysfunction in susceptible patients.